On Leadership, Perspective and Toxic CEOs

6 Types of Toxic CEO's

 

This Infographic brought to you by GetVoip

Creating Law and Order: Leading with Discipline

Discipline

Are you leading with discipline? Does this type of leader describe you?

  • You actually enjoy routine. In fact, if there is no structure, you create one. After all, routines promote efficiency, high productivity, and accuracy, right?
  • Starting a day without a schedule or knowing exactly what to do could potentially leave one aimless. That’s what makes it so difficult for you to work with or for someone who doesn’t create structure, for themselves or others.
  • Sure, there’s time for fun and breaks, you enjoy those too, as long as they fit into the overall scheme of things.

This outlook on your job and life can be attributed to your Discipline strength.

Your Barrier Labels

Discipline is definitely a good thing, especially when it’s self-imposed. Your bosses love that you get things done without supervision, your employees always know what’s expected and when, and your peers know they can count on you. Unfortunately, before people get to know you or your Strengths, you need to be aware of some of the labels people may tag you is a less than flattering light.

In an unsophisticated manner, Discipline can appear overbearing, mechanized, or unable to handle change. In short, a leader no one wants to come to or lean on.

A Sophisticated Leader

If you’ve ever been described using the barrier labels above, the good news is you have Discipline! That means, you have the ability to discipline yourself to become sophisticated; practicing the art of balance takes self-imposed structure, which you have plenty of.

The even better news? Once you have mastered your Discipline, you’ll be known and recognized as a great planner, highly productive and efficient, and extremely accurate. Nothing wrong with that is there?

As a sophisticated leader, your strategy for success is going to be knowing when things are too rigid, and when they aren’t rigid enough. In general, people don’t enjoy being micromanaged. However, they do like to know how to be successful, and some may even need a hint on how to get there.

By leveraging one or more of your other strengths, i.e. Relator, you will be able to adjust your style with the human factor in mind. Because some of your other strengths allow you to connect to your people, or see the bigger picture, you’ll be able to pull back on the Discipline in your leadership style when necessary, and create boundaries when and where they’re needed.

Leading those with Discipline

If you’re a leader with more “free slowing” strengths, like Adaptability, Futuristic, or Harmony, you may find there is some friction between you and your employee with Discipline. If they are constantly seeking structure, and you are unable to provide any, they may become frustrated.

Though they can create their own routine, there will be others on your team that need a little more guidance. If you, as a leader, don’t provide it, Discipline is going to notice. Chances are, there will be someone on the team under delivering, or delivering late, which affects the whole team. Even if it’s an indirect effect, Discipline will feel it more than most and quickly become dissatisfied with you as a leader, and their job as a whole.

Now, that doesn’t mean you need to try and be just like them. It just means you need to be aware and as consistent as possible. Make sure that everyone has deadlines, and they have the guidance and resources they need to produce. You’re already an apt leader, so no major adjustments should be necessary!

If you’re a leader with Discipline, how do you balance your need for structure with the strengths of others? Do you lead someone with Discipline? Do you find them to be reliable? Do they often ask you for deadlines, schedules etc.? How do you handle that on days you might find it “overbearing?”

**********

Never miss an issue of Linked 2 Leadership, subscribe today
Learn, Grow & Develop Other Leaders

———————–
Alexsys "Lexy" Thompson HCS, SWP

Alexsys “Lexy” Thompson is Managing Partner at Fokal Fusion
She helps building Strong Leaders through Strong People Strategy
Email | LinkedIn | Twitter | Facebook | Web

Image Sources: jayblock.com

Lessons From Argentine Reaction to World Cup Loss

Argentina Riots

VIDEO: Riots erupted in Argentina after World Cup loss.

High hopes and expectations gave way to defeat, shock, dejection and finally to pain, anger and destruction.

This was the 120-minute journey taken by Argentina’s national football team’s supporters who had gathered at a public square viewing area in Buenos Aires, to watch the final 2014 FIFA World Cup match between Argentina and Germany. Chaos erupted after Argentina lost to Germany.

Who publicly vents their frustration through riotous acts of violence and hooliganism because of a loss?

Success Today

Before we rush to condemn the fans’ behavior, it’s important to consider what may have led them to do what they did. In today’s world, success is highly overrated. We celebrate those who come first, conquer (however we define that), make it big, win awards and medals, achieve in one way or other. It’s all about positive feelings, positive emotions and positive labels.

On the other hand, we look down upon those who have suffered defeat, loss and humiliation. For them, it’s negative, negative, negative – feelings, emotions and labels. They’re not good enough, they’ve failed, lost, let themselves and us down.

So it’s shame, shame, shame!

Acting Out

And so for Argentina’s fans, theirs was not just a case of lawlessness. They were simply projecting on the outside what they were going through on the inside – their pain and disappointment. But, one may – nay, SHOULD – ask whether the fans could have displayed their feelings of loss differently.

After all, with no exception, we go through loss and defeat at different times in our lives.

  • Does that give us the license to take to the streets every time we lose and generally make other people’s lives miserable in the process? Especially when the loss is so intense, it’s palpable.
  • Or, do we have a choice as to how to respond to loss?

To quote a popular saying, we need to win with humility and lose with grace. But, what does it mean to lose with grace? In this post, I share a 3-step process that one can follow.

3-Steps to Winning With Humility and Losing With Grace

1) Accept That You Have Lost

Once you’ve lost, you’ve lost. You can’t wish the loss away. And you can’t turn back the clock, to translate the loss into a win. So, admit that you’ve lost. Allow yourself to come to terms with your loss and grieve if you must.

Argentina’s loss to Germany was boldly summed up by Joao Cuenca, who has an Argentine father and a Brazilian mother:

“This was a trauma. We were going to be able to leave singing songs in victory with the glory of the Cup. What happened is nothing short of a disaster.”

Ouch! The good news is that facing your loss and pain head on makes it much easier for the healing process to begin.

2) Learn All You Can

At one time or other, you will lose. It’s just a matter of time. And each loss has a lesson embedded in it.

  • Ask yourself what you can take away from the experience and make it work for you.
  • Don’t waste your loss.
  • The good news is that losing does not make you a loser.
  • It’s an experience, not a state.
  • So, make it your aim to learn all you can from any and every loss.
  • Drawing lessons can help you emerge a stronger, better person.
  • Apply those lessons to future pursuits, to improve your chances of succeeding then.

Internationally recognized leadership expert, speaker, coach and author, John Maxwell says in his book Sometimes You Win Sometimes You Learn, that winning isn’t everything, but learning is. Don’t waste your experiences whether it’s a win or a loss. Learn from both.

3) Move On

Easier said than done, but you must. Don’t camp where you lost the game – for if you do, you’ll waste the chance to get ready for your next big opportunity. Guard against what Abraham Graham Bell, the late Scottish scientist, inventor, engineer and innovator warned about:

“When one door closes another door opens, but we so often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door, that we do not see the ones which open for us.”

You have to make the decision to keep moving through other open doors. You never know – your next win may be far greater than your last loss. As long as you’re alive, keep moving.

Leading Through Loss

Indeed, better days lie ahead if you accept your past losses, learn from them and move on to seize future opportunities. This lesson applies in sports, family, business, community and in life.

How do you currently deal with loss in your life? Does it make the situation better or worse? How could you respond to losses more effectively?

**********

Never miss an issue of Linked 2 Leadership, subscribe today here!
Learn, Grow & Develop Other Leaders

——————–
Joyce Kaduki

Mrs. Joyce Kaduki is a Leadership Coach, Speaker & Trainer
She enjoys working with Individuals & Teams to help them Improve their Results
Email | LinkedIn | Web

Image Sources:

On Leadership, Growth and Doing it Anyway

Do It Anyway

Do you know that song by Martina McBride titled “Anyway?”  

In the very first verse of the song she says this:

You can spend your whole life building
Something from nothin’
One storm can come and blow it all away
Build it anyway”

On Life and Making Lemonade

My husband graduated from college and spent 6 years in the Air Force.  Then we settled down in my home town to raise our family and he went to work as an engineer for a large company.  We raised 3 boys.

I began a business. We invested and began preparing for the day that we could retire. We seemed to be on the right track as a couple and a family.

But despite our best laid plans, life brought us some lemons. Our lives changed in directions for which we had not planned:

  • We did not expect that my husband would lose his job after 15 yrs
  • I did not anticipate that my business would begin to lose money
  • We did not know that our son would cost us everything that we had worked for (at least as far as the things of the world are concerned.)

Lemons, Lemons, and More Lemons

Our youngest son became involved in drug and alcohol abuse.  He spent 4 years going to jail, hospitals, and rehab. There were about 3 years that I did not sleep through the night in anticipation of a phone call from the police. I was never sure if they would want us to pick him up or identify his body.

To say the least, these were very difficult years for our family!

The courts held us financially responsible for the crimes that our son committed while he was a minor child.

  • We paid fees, restitution and hospital bills
  • We paid for couple of rehabilitation periods
  • We suffered emotionally, mentally, and career-wise

Because of the time away from work for court and family rehab sessions, my husband’s work performance decreased. When it came time for layoffs at his workplace, he was on the list.  When he lost his job, we lost our ability to pay for our home. My business began to fail and our property investments no longer rented for enough to pay the mortgage.

…More Lemons

As a result, we lost 2 properties, our home, and my business. We continued to fight to save our son. My husband finally found a job in a different state and he relocated. I had to remain where I was to close my business, sell the properties, and be with my son who was not finished with school.

On Making That Lemonade

Over time, my son finally completed his GED and got a good job. It took all the worldly possessions that we had, but our son is alive, healthy, drug free, and working.

After 18 months I was able to join my husband in our new home. I had to start over. He had to start over. I won’t lie, it was the most difficult time of our marriage. We became stronger than ever as a couple by pulling together for the sake of our family.

Although we were financially ruined, I can say with all the confidence in the world this:

Losing your fortune is not that big a deal. After all, it is just money. You can get more of that.

There is no battle more worth fighting that the battle to save a child. There is no amount of money that could change my opinion on the financial, emotional, and family decisions that we made. In fact, I would do it all over again for what we gained.

Keep Trying. It’s Worth It All

Now it is time to start building again.

Did I hesitate to start over? 

Absolutely.

Did I fear the idea of losing again?

You better believe it.

Is it going to be painful and difficult?

You better believe that, too!

Did it stop me?

NO!

There is nothing more painful than the thought of losing a child. Losing “stuff,” well that was easy by comparison. Your true success lies in what you put your hope in.

So, what sort of life-altering challenges have you faced that you were able to overcome? How did that build your character, your family, your relationships, or your business? Are you facing something now and need encouragement? If so, please connect with me and I think I can offer some sound personal advice. I would love to help.

**********

Never miss an issue of Linked 2 Leadership, subscribe today here.
Learn, Grow & Develop Other Leaders

———————–
Phyllis Rodriguez

Phyllis Rodriguez is a Producer at Insphere Insurance Solutions
She serves as an Associate Broker, Short Sale and REO Specialist
Email | LinkedIn | Facebook | Web | Personal | 520-220-4021

Image Sources: rlv.zcache.com.au

5 Ways To Be An Exceptional Leader

5 Ways To Be An Exceptional Leader #Infographic

On Leadership, Persistence and The Strong-Willed Leader

My Way

When I was a kid, I was known to be a little hard-headed at times. I must have driven my parents crazy with all the times that I refused to do what they asked me to do.

I wanted to do things my way.

What Goes Around…

I can see that God has a great sense of humor now that we’ve had our daughter, Ava, because she definitely inherited the hard-headed gene. I say that I see a sense of humor because if I don’t laugh, I’d be crying!

In educational circles, we would call Ava a “strong-willed child.” As parents, we call it “you make me want to scream, now get into timeout!

You have just  got to love those hard-headed kids that insist on getting things their way, don’t you? We joke with Ava that she’s going to be a lawyer because she negotiates every last request that we make of her.

  • We ask her to eat all her dinner before she can get dessert and she will try to negotiate it down to taking just a few more bites.
  • She even tries to negotiate the amount of time that she spends in timeout when we discipline her.

It took her a while to learn that we might negotiate dinner portions, but we will not negotiate timeout. We haven’t budged on that front once, but she keeps on trying. She just won’t take “no” for an answer.

Just Saying No

I have realized over time that many of the successes that I’ve had in my life were because of my hard-headedness. The same is true for all leaders. Sometimes “no” comes out as someone saying, “it can’t be done” or “no one has ever done that before.

However you phrase it, it still means “no.” I have learned that “no” is just temporary. Persistence pays if you want something badly enough.

Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm.” ~ Winston Churchill

What’s the Big Idea?

All success starts with an idea and a desire to make it happen. This idea becomes fixed in our mind as something that we’re going to achieve. We’re not talking about the fleeing ideas that we allow to pass.

We have to grab hold of the one that we can become convicted about. Grab hold of it and don’t let it go until it’s achieved. All great success stories start off this way.

Desire is the starting point of all achievement, not a hope, not a wish, but a keen pulsating desire which transcends everything.” ~ Napoleon Hill 

Determination to Succeed

True determination comes from knowing, not just wishing, that your idea will succeed. It has to be so fixed in your mind that you are determined to make it come to life.

Any setback that you may feel is a minor one in the scheme of things. Having determination means that you are willing to make sacrifices in order to succeed. Do you really want this thing that you’re striving for?

Persistence Is Key

Persistence and determination run hand-in-hand with one another. Nothing worthwhile ever comes right away. Those that are willing to persist through the adversity that life throws their way are the ones that succeed. Times will be tough.

It seems like life will do what it can to test you. Life will throw you a few setbacks just to be sure. How do you persist through the tough times?

Keep Good People Around You

The people around you can help lift you up when you’re feeling down. The pressures of success can wear on leaders from time to time and encouragement from the people around them are special cogs in their success engine.

I have been blessed enough to have family and friends who believed in me attaining my dreams that failure wasn’t an option in their eyes. They know without any shadow of a doubt that I can be successful in what I do. Who are you spending time with that will lift you up?

This post was adapted from Rich Bishop’s book, “Child-Like Leadership.”

**********

Never miss an issue of Linked 2 Leadership, subscribe today.
Learn, Grow & Develop Other Leaders

———————–
Rich Bishop

Rich Bishop is President of Bishop Coaching & Consulting Group
He takes a hands-on approach to your Development through Coaching & Training
Email | LinkedIn | Twitter | Facebook | Web | Blog | Book

Image Source: ronedmondson.com

 

Leaders: Do You Want Compliance or Engagement?

Compliance or Engagement?

To achieve the highest levels of success within an industry today, organizations should be focused on creating training programs that develop better leaders, not better managers.

Management vs. Leadership

Often times the terms leadership and management are used interchangeably yet these two words could not be more opposite in the outcomes they produce within an organization.

Merriam Webster’s Dictionary defines the verb lead asto guide on a way especially by going in advance,” while it defines manage as, “to make and keep compliant.”

Unlike managing, which requires a title to influence compliance, leading simply requires that an individual demonstrate a set of behaviors that inspires others to want to follow. In contrast managing can gain compliance whether or not the individual wants to do what is requested.

For an organization to meet its full potential in today’s environment, focusing on developing leadership behaviors, not management behaviors, may hold the key to that realization.

Effective Leadership Preparation

There is substantial research that demonstrates the positive impact leadership behaviors have on an organization’s culture and bottom line. Research from one consulting group suggested this:

When facing changes in the business environment, 86% of companies with strategic leadership development programmes are able to respond rapidly compared with just 52% of companies with less mature leadership programmes.”

Highly developed leaders often show behaviors that engage and motivate those around them to want to say “yes” to what is being asked of them. This request might involve physical action or to support a vision or a direction that the leader would like their employees to embrace.

Leadership Lesson Learned

Management vs. LeadershipI once worked with an executive who unknowingly illustrated the difference between leading and managing with his own staff.

He was a hard-driving individual, who was often critical of the work of those that reported to him regardless of the high quality.

As well, he was not effective at setting clear and consistent guidelines for his team, rarely recognized his people for their effort, and was often incongruent between his own behaviors and what he expected of his staff.

His rationale for his behavior was that if he provided praise or too much direction, it would make his people “weak.” When questioned on developing behaviors that might engage his people, he responded by saying he got the results he needed with his current behavior so why change.

Getting Even Better Results

I could not disagree that he got results with his current behavior because his team performed well. What I did know from my many sessions with his direct reports was that he was not getting the best results he could from his group because of his behaviors.

While they complied with every request he made, they did not feel engaged or motivated to advocate for change in areas they felt the company would benefit.

By definition, this executive was very skilled at “managing” his people, which was evident in their high level of compliance. Although the executive’s employees delivered results, a lack of leadership behaviors stifled the team from delivering the best results.

Focusing On What Matters

Over the next two years, several of his employees left the organization causing a huge talent vacuum as well as a morale issue. Rather than focusing on behaviors that created compliance, this executive should have focused on behaviors in which his employees felt engaged, empowered and motivated to give more.

Had this executive demonstrated behaviors that exhibited more respect for his employees’ ideas, encouraged them to take risks, as well as praised them for their contributions, he would have experienced a far greater return on his investment than gaining compliance provided.

Compliance or Engagement, Not Both

In today’s hyper-competitive business climate, the behaviors of those in positions of authority will often create either compliance or engagement, but not both.

Rather than focusing on developing management behaviors, which gain compliance, organizations would be best suited to focus on the development of leadership behaviors that create an engaged, empowered and motivated work environment.

**********

Never miss an issue of Linked 2 Leadership, subscribe today here!
Learn, Grow & Develop Other Leaders

——————–
Patrick Veroneau, MS Organizational Leadership

Patrick Veroneau, MS is CEO of Emery Leadership Group
He inspires Others to Develop Effective Leadership Behaviors
Email | LinkedIn | Twitter | Web 

Image Sources: media02.hongkiat.com, slideshare.com, leadershipdevelopmentworkshops.com

 

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 42,603 other followers

%d bloggers like this: