I’m a Leader Now But No One Likes Me

Confused

What too many people fail to grasp is that one doesn’t become a leader overnight.  You may have the title, but that’s not all it takes to be successful.  To become a good leader takes some planning and experience.

Have you ever felt like this:

“I was “one of them” on Friday, but since I’m their supervisor now, no one likes me.  Why?”

You probably made the jump too suddenly.

Learning Leadership

When people tell me they want to be a leader in their organization or I hear that someone is being looked at to fill an upcoming position, the first thing I tell them is to start the transition NOW.  Plan and learn.

Don’t wait to make a sudden change over a weekend, because you’ll set yourself up for disaster.

Two Lessons on Leadership

Here are a couple of stories to illustrate what I’m talking about.

Story One

Mike has been one of the guys since he started at ABC Company.  He knows his job well, and that of the department, but really only does what’s required.  He watches the clock, is always yucking it up with everyone, and hits the bars every Friday afternoon having drinks with the best of them.

But behind all of that, Mike does think about moving up and his managers believe he has some good leadership potential.  A supervisor position is getting ready to open up in 2 weeks and Mike is offered the job.  That means more money, control and responsibility.  He says he’s up for the challenge.

Mike does nothing to prepare, thinking he’ll learn what he needs to know once he starts.  He continues his ways and on Friday Mike goes out with the gang and pounds shots.  On Monday morning, Mike is a straight-laced, all business, suit, barking orders around every corner.  What do you think the reaction of his staff is to this new look?  “What the h*ll happened to you?”  Is his staff ready to work for/with him?  I don’t think so Tim.

From then on, Mike is in an uphill battle to get respect and support.

Story Two

Patty, on the hand, knew she wanted to be a leader within the ABC Company someday.  Everyone likes her and although she’s also one of the guys, she never goes overboard.

She has fun, but within limits.

Patty, like Mike, knows her job and the department well.  But unlike Mike, she asks questions and tries to understand the business as much as she can.  She also reads leadership blogs online (i.e., Linked2Leadership) and participates in leadership type webinars.  The people she works with know where she’s headed some day.  So it comes as no surprise that when a leadership position opens in her department, she’s offered the job and accepts.

She immediately asks for time during the next two weeks to meet with experienced leaders to discuss her new position and to ask questions.  At the same time Patty discusses how this new position is going to alter her relationships with her,

  • old peers/new team,
  • new peers/other leaders,
  • old/new boss, and
  • . . . family.

How do you think Patty’s transition goes, compared to Mike’s?  I see much success in Patty’s future.

Leadership and Family

When I talk to people about changing relationships, many don’t immediately understand how there’s a change with family.  After all, work and family are two separate things.  Well, not exactly.  Even though we like to keep the two separate, they’re pretty well intertwined.  The added responsibility of being a leader is going to cause more stress, working more hours, and possibly travel, among other things.

Your future is also your family’s future.

Don’t get caught up just looking at the job itself.  It’s going to affect other people besides you.  The better prepared they are, the less stress it will cause.

It’s never too late to learn and plan for the future.  It doesn’t matter if you’re an up and comer, or you’re a director, or even a CEO.  Learning should be a lifelong endeavor.

When we stop learning, we stop growing.

The two books I always recommend to people when they’re starting out in their first leadership role are:

These books are not only good for new leaders but also serve as great reminders and inspiration – and some new info – for the seasoned leader.

It takes little effort, or time, to read a couple of blogs or books here and there.  Then be sure to share that new found information with the people coming up underneath you.  Remember, some of those people are going to be in your position some day.

Have you planned your future?  Do you discuss your future with your family?  Are you investing in continued learning?  Are you helping others succeed?

**********

Never miss an issue of Linked 2 Leadership, subscribe today here
Learn, Grow & Develop Other Leaders

——————–
Andy Uskavitch

Andy Uskavitch is Leadership Development and Customer Service Specialist
He develops and facilitates Leadership, Motivation & Teambuilding Seminars
Email | LinkedIn | Facebook | Twitter | Blog |  (727) 568-5433

Image Sources: fm.cnbc.com/

Leadership Experience: Where Do Theory and Reality Meet?

Learn Lead

I continue to read and learn from various articles, blogs and books on the subject of leadership. There really is an unlimited supply of material for us to read!

And reading new content provides the opportunity for our thoughts and actions to be challenged.

New Points of View

New challenges to our thinking occurs when we see examples of theoretical context provided that relate to leadership application and effectiveness in practice.

There is a definite place for the theory of leadership. Without it, the same ideas and concepts continue to be generated and espoused by a variety of authors, learning little beyond that which has been distributed for some years.

  • However, I wonder how important the theoretical content is compared to the ability and experience gained through practical leadership?
  • Where is the balance between testing your own thinking through reading, seeking answers, being mentored and the opportunity and ability to put leadership into practice?

Developing Future Leaders

Questions such as these are particularly relevant for those of us who work in the field of developing and coaching future leaders. At some point there has to be a practical level of experience gained through leading others to test and try out the theories and concepts.

This is where real, entrenched learning occurs.

The relevance of learning and continually developing your ability is very important in many aspects of our lives, including when learning to become a leader. The potential to lead exists in you.

(People) learn to be better leaders as long as they engage in activities that help them learn how. Because to master leadership you have to have a strong desire to excel, you have to believe strongly that you can learn new skills and abilities, and you have to be willing to devote yourself to continuous learning and deliberate practice. No matter how good you are, you can always get better. ~The Truth About Leadership, Kouzes and Posner

The How of Leadership

It is the ‘how’ leadership growth and effectiveness occurs that intrigues me. In addition to the broad elements of leadership success already highlighted, various attitudes and behaviors are predominant in those who I have seen and/or helped to succeed in leading others.

When the right attitudes and behaviors are more apparent in an upcoming leader, the base for development appears to be exponentially greater.

The starting point is much more solid, providing improved opportunity to succeed as a leader:

  • The willingness and ability to assist others and their development through teaching, guiding and mentoring provides a ‘win-win’ in that the teacher and student have opportunity to learn and test ideas.
  • By giving in terms of mentoring and coaching I have learned much about myself, human behaviour and organisational culture.
  • Connectedness, trust and the ability to build genuine relationships form the basis for developing people.
  • The desire to make a difference is inherent.
  • Exposure  to a large variety of people and conducting open conversations are a wonderful platform for learning generally, particularly in a leadership and business environment. Sadly, this is not the norm. Making sure that diversity is a benefit within a culture or team, not a negative.
  • People are often fearful of sharing, preferring to hide their honest views and develop a strategy of shielding others from the ‘real’ them. Often this is exaggerated within the leader-employee context. Breaking down this resistance and earning the right to ask and listen is a key requirement for this relationship to foster change.

Maximizing Leadership

We learn through reading, observing, succeeding, failing and tackling the many other opportunities that arise through our work and outside commitments.

The opportunities to grow are maximised through practice and application.

To the original point though,  the need to practically apply the learning is an imperative to truly master any skill, as is certainly the case with leadership. We all have opportunities to develop and portray leadership in many aspects of our lives, both formally and informally, in and out of the workplace.

Applied Leadership

The theoretical tenets  of leadership do not replace the need to apply leadership principles in practice. Real experience in leading people, influencing, feeling genuine growth and embedding of knowledge is the result of both theory and practice.

Learning to lead is the outcome of various inputs and contributions, but whatever your official role, it starts with your attitude to learning and willingness to dedicate yourself to the art and science of leadership.

You must have the attitude of a leader to become a leader.

**********

Never miss an issue of Linked 2 Leadership, subscribe today.
Learn, Grow & Develop Other Leaders

———————
Steve Riddle

Steve Riddle is the owner of CoachStation
He is making a difference by focusing on leadership & people development
Email | LinkedIn | Twitter | Facebook | Web | Skype: steve.riddle36

Image Sources: compeap.com

 

On Leadership, Loyalty and Listening to Your Customers

Listening to the Voice of the Customer

When it comes to leadership, every leader needs to understand that they are on the front lines with everyone looking at them. And this especially true in business when it is your customers who are watching you.

They look to you to understand them, serve them, and know their needs.

Really Knowing Your Customers

There’s more to knowing your customers than just being aware of their age, income level, and stage of life; savvy companies are intimately attuned to their customers’ unique personality profiles, quirks, desires, and world views. Urban Outfitters even describes some of its core customers as “upscale homeless” — people who just do things differently.

“Voice of Customer” is a concept that describes the in-depth process of collecting information about customers’ sentiments, expectations, preferences, likes, and dislikes to improve the customer experience. These insights are extremely valuable to companies for tailoring products and services to meet or exceed customers’ expectations and making the customer experience a positive interaction every time.

Positive Experiences Make Loyal Customers

Listening to your customersSome of the most important benefits of Voice of Customer programs are improved customer retention and increased customer loyalty. Companies with the lowest customer churn rates and highest levels of new business from referrals are the ones that consistently provide the best customer experiences.

Customer experiences drive word-of-mouth referrals. News travels fast; bad news travels faster. Customers are three times more likely to tell others about bad customer experiences than good ones.

Lackluster experiences push customers away and make it more difficult for companies to gain new customers.

This only feels like poor leadership from the customers’ point-of-view.

Empathetic Listening Improves Experiences

Before a company can improve customer experiences, it must understand where its current offerings fall short; this requires a deep understanding of what customers want, like, and value.

Organizations frequently implement new processes designed to support interactions with customers, but how does an organization know how those processes impact customer experiences? Only Voice of Customer affords the ability to understand whether the processes unintentionally erect barriers to purchase, cause customers to become confused, or make dealing with the company more arduous.

Careful listening is absolutely essential for successful Voice of Customer initiatives, and that doesn’t mean listening politely while waiting to talk.

Businesses must employ careful, empathetic listening across all channels to learn about and understand their customers.

Persistent listening helps identify and start meaningful dialogues with individual customers. When Voice of Customer is being heard, the company knows what went wrong and has the opportunity to remedy a customer’s poor experience by acting quickly to make things right.

Share Information to Provide Value

Customer listening should not be a snapshot from one moment in time. It must be considered an ongoing conversation that enables companies to see what resonates and what needs improvement.

This means the data from specific customer interactions must be shared across the enterprise in a timely fashion. The longer information remains in a silo, the more the value of the information diminishes.

Sharing across departments is vital because processes in all departments impact the overall customer experience.

When customer feedback is routed directly to research and development and product managers, concepts for an innovative service offering and enhanced product development processes can be put in motion. Feedback can also illuminate other important insights like the critical time to market, the “sweet spot” for price points, competitors’ activities, potential crises, and ways to improve or reduce customer service costs.

Adopting a continuous learning cycle results in making adjustments to an offering while it’s still in development, rather than waiting until it’s completely finished. After an arrow has been shot, the trajectory can’t be adjusted while it’s still in flight. But if the arrow’s aim can be corrected before release, there’s still an opportunity to hit the bull’s-eye.

This is the essence of customer leadership.

Delight Customers for the Long Term

By staying connected to customers and cultivating those relationships, companies with effective Voice of Customer programs are more adaptive and better equipped to anticipate market changes and make business decisions proactively, rather than scrambling to adjust to new market dynamics. If customers are delighted, the company will enjoy much longer relationships with them.

So, what does your leadership look like in the eyes of the customer? Do they feel like you understand, know, and care about them and their needs? What have you done to sharpen your listening skills to truly hear your customers’ voice? I would love to hear your thoughts!

**********

Never miss an issue of Linked 2 Leadership, subscribe today here
Learn, Grow & Develop Other Leaders

———————–
Stephen Monaco

Stephen Monaco is an integrated marketing expert, author and speaker
Monaco advises companies on Driving Strategies & Leveraging Digital Media
Email | LinkedIn | Twitter |  Book | Web

Image Sources: vocanic.com, smallbizkaizen.com

The Five Key Benefits of Leading the Learning

JFK

After 25 plus years developing and facilitating training for clients in a wide variety of industries large and small,  a consistent theme I see is that there is a lot of management and very little real leadership going on.  

This phenomenon was no more apparent than in the area of organizational learning.

Commitment to Learning

A commitment to learning initiatives from leadership becomes clear through their commitment to the process of learning and growing people.  You can readily spot the ones that throw dollars to paint the picture of developing staff and the ones who are truly committed to it.  The attitude is reflected in the leadership which is then also reflected in the attitude of the learners.

Part of the failure is in the ability of the leaders to see that direct connection between leading and learning on its many levels.

U.S. President John F. Kennedy planned to point to this in the speech that he never gave.  In his notes from the speech he planned to deliver in Dallas the day he was shot, President Kennedy notes had in pure, blunt words:

“Leadership and learning are indispensable to each other.”

Organizational Learning

The organizations that survive and, more to the point, thrive in today’s economy will be the ones who are fully committed to learning on all levels.

  • Business size is immaterial.
  • Number of employees is irrelevant.
  • Industry is meaningless.

Survival and growth for the organization can only be sustained where there is a consistent commitment to continual growth for every member of the organization.

And that flows from executive level on down.

Okay, but what are some REAL benefits to executive level leading of learning within an organization?  With a background in training and development, I was naturally curious and spent some time looking at what some world-wide leaders had to say about this.

From that, here are just 5 ways you realize benefits by leading the learning organization.

Five Benefits of Leading the Learning

1) Communication of Vision

As a leader, sharing the vision with your team is critical.  John Maxwell, in his book 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership, states that the leader is a steward of the vision and as such must both communicate and model the picture of the vision.  When learning initiatives reinforce vision both through communication and equipping, then you also empower employees to behave consistent with that vision.

2) Competitive Advantage

Jack Welch said this:

“An organization’s ability to learn, and translate that learning into action rapidly, is the ultimate competitive advantage.”  

Newer, more efficient ways of doing things are discovered that helps save money and increase effectiveness.

3) Superior Performance

When team members, including executives and management, have been properly equipped they can perform extraordinarily.

4) Value

Value takes on many meanings here.  Like #1 above, communicating organizational values is an important part of developing people and building consistency and effectiveness.

“Learning initiatives provide one way to pass values along; especially when leaders participate in the same learning initiatives as everyone else.”

In addition, there is adding and receiving value.  C-level commitment to learning adds value to employees and provides them with the mindset and tools to add value back to the organization.

5) Connection

Learning initiatives initiated by, promoted by, and participated in by organizational leaders provides real connections with management and employees, as well as connections with the external environment.  In addition, it helps to connect what they learn with personal and organizational goals.  Trust builds.  Participation on all levels in the welfare of the organization becomes possible.

Loyalty no longer is a term we use to refer to the way things used to be.

We work harder for those we care about and those who care about us.  The learning organization provides the opportunities for establishing human connections that can communicate the care and respect.  Better relationships lead to better productivity.

The Big Leadership Learning Challenge

The challenge comes when resources meet our desires in this direction and where the commitment on the part of C-level leadership becomes the linchpin.

Commitment to the process means when budgets are trimmed, learning initiatives that emphasize equipping employees for their work are maintained on some level.  Without that, instead of the learning organization we have the failing organization.

Questions:

  1. As a leader, how committed are you to initiatives that truly equip your team to perform?  How can you better show your commitment?
  2. How do you participate in those initiatives?
  3. If budgets had to be cut, what one initiative would you insist on maintaining?  Why?  What measures can you implement to ensure it continues?

**********

Never miss an issue of Linked 2 Leadership, subscribe today here!
Learn, Grow & Develop Other Leaders

———————–
Paul Simkins
Paul Simkins is Chief Discovery Officer of Ah-Ha! Moments Living
He is a speaker, trainer, and coach on leadership and personal growth
Email | LinkedIn | Twitter | Facebook | Web | Skype: psimkinsjr

Image Sources:  images.cdn.fotopedia.com

How Leaders Can Create a Culture of Feedback

Time for Feedback

Creating a culture of feedback is vital to any organization. Giving and receiving feedback is something every leader should be comfortable with.

To be an influential leader requires that you be genuine, authentic and real to make a positive impact on your teams.

A Partnership for Learning

The best way to champion feedback is approach it as partnership for learning.

  • People who are well-coached about their performance are better positioned to make changes and take action toward a better future.
  • Giving feedback is an important part of developing others and developing yourself as a leader and communicator.
  • Being vulnerable to both giving and receiving feedback are the two of the most important skills you can learn, or improve, if you want to maximize your leadership and the success of your team.

4 Crucial Questions

As a leader giving feedback, ask yourself the following 4 questions to make feedback an integral part of your culture:

1) Am I ready to listen, ask questions, and accept that I may not fully understand the issue?

When you have a mindset that’s open and welcoming, you are approaching the communication of feedback from a positive more peaceful place. You are willing to be wrong or admit mistakes in the dialogue of feedback within your team. You are willing to say, “Help me understand better.”

2) Am I willing to acknowledge what you do well instead of picking apart your mistakes?

This is something all leaders need to pay attention to. Are we strictly focusing on what needs to be corrected or are we looking at the glass half-full to help the recipient understand they have good things in them as well?

Everyone has the ability to contribute and make a difference but leaders have to share the observations and thoughts to appreciate also what is going well.

3) Am I willing to hold you accountable without blaming you by placing the problem in front of us and not between us?

It takes courage and a strong relationship to move from blame to working together as a cohesive unit to tackle the issues of the day. Leaders need other people as part of their leadership journey as no one can be successful alone.

By blaming others, we create a culture of conflict and isolation.

Everyone seeks to win on their own terms.  When we are facing a challenge in our organization, we need to face it together to maximize our strengths.

4) Is the feedback leading to our growth and opportunity?

As leaders, we need to keep in mind the long term objective of how feedback improves relationships and creates growth in our organization. Feedback is more than just an annual conversation between you and your team members.

Feedback: An On Going Dialogue

It should really be an on-going dialogue and an opportunity to nurture everyone on the team. Feedback sessions can be small opportunities for development and exploring more of the talent existing in our organization.

Setting the team up for success for growth and learning should be the leader’s foremost responsibilities.

**********

Never miss an issue of Linked 2 Leadership, subscribe today
Learn, Grow & Develop Other Leaders

———————–
Tal Shnall
Tal Shnall Coach/Trainer Development Renaissance Hotel Dallas Richardson
He specializes in Service and Leadership Development
Email | LinkedIn | Twitter | Blog

Image Sources: arbeits-abc.de

Developing Employees – The Role of Personality

Personalities at Work

One day when I was working as Learning & Development Manager in a German corporation, an executive approached me to talk about a manager on his team who was seen as difficult to deal with.

The man was not focused at work, he sometimes missing deadlines, and he was not a clear communicator.

However, he had been working for the company for many years, and his manager wanted to keep him on board. Many previous attempts to correct his behavior had not worked out. This manager was in his late 40′s and the executive asked me this question:

“Do you think we can still change his personality?”

Answering the Question

  • Do people change personality?
  • Can they change to “become someone else?”
  • Are people stuck with what they have become when we meet them?

Here is Another Scenario

My husband was working with a programmer who was being groomed for a career as a top-notch specialist. He was excellent at his job, yet his management did not consider him for a leadership position because they felt  “that’s just not who he is”.

These examples lead to an interesting question:

Is our personality carved in stone?

Can People Change?

I am a psychologist with a career in employee learning and development, so it is not surprising that I fundamentally believe that people can change.

But what does research say?

In the early days of personality research, psychologists came up with many different models to measure people’s personalities. Most of them had one thing in common:

  • They measured personality traits
  • Supposedly anchored in the brain structure
  • Have a stable starting in early adulthood

Nowadays, science is leaning more towards a fluid and contextual understanding of personality.  The situation in which a person displays a certain behavior has an influence on how the person reacts.

Personality Traits

In leadership training, models that assess personality traits (MBTI, DISC etc.) are widely used. Most of these models understand personality traits as relatively stable. I like using these models for example as a tool to get a quick assessment of your team’s personalities.

With the information provided in these assessments, leaders can quickly understand how to approach individual team members, adjust their leadership style and distribute tasks according to personal styles of employees.

The risk in extensively using these models is that they lead to assume that personality is carved in stone. I believe that focusing too much on personality traits takes responsibility away from yourself: As an individual, you’re not actively trying to be your best self.

As a leader, you might not give your employees your best effort to develop and coach them.

A Smart Approach

In reality, there is ample research evidence to support both approaches. And at this point in time, it is not possible to say which one is correct.

In the end, I believe that it doesn’t really matter for you as a leader.

Instead of musing about personality, focus on behavior instead. If an employee is not performing on the level you expect her to perform, ask yourself what the reason might be. Does the employee lack skills and knowledge to do the job, or is it maybe a question of self-confidence and motivation?

Adapting Your Leadership Style

Adapt your leadership style according to the needs of your employee. Agree on SMART goals with your employee in order to measure performance, and review progress regularly. Give your employee regular and timely feedback on her behavior. Be specific, e.g. by pointing out that she showed good leadership when facilitating a meeting.

In my experience, the most relevant factor to learning and changing behavior is the will to do so, open-mindedness, and a commitment to continuous improvement.

The programmer I mentioned before received continuous feedback and coaching from his manager. He was highly motivated to develop towards a leadership role and worked hard to improve his skills.

He is now considered a high-potential within the company and will be definitely be considered for a management position in the future.

So, how are you doing in understanding the best ways to use personality and personality profiles in leading your people? Have you been giving people “a pass” for poor performance because you simply “accept their personality?” Or have you been effective in coach/training beyond personality? I would love to hear your thoughts!

**********

Never miss an issue of Linked 2 Leadership, subscribe today here!
Learn, Grow & Develop Other Leaders

———————–
Katrin Kaehler
Katrin Kaehler steers Organizational Learning and Development
Before moving to the US, she worked in International Roles in Europe
Email | LinkedIn |  TwitterWeb

Image Sources: success.com

Leadership Guidance: As Parents and Mentors

Handwritten Letter

Leadership points to ponder for teenagers are just as relevant to adults, especially new leaders, viewed via a father’s letter to a teen.

A Father’s Letter

Today you turn 13 years old. I am amazed at how quickly this time has gone and the next 10 years will fly by as well. Then you will be well into your 20′s, however there is a lot that you will see, hear and be tempted by during this time. Much of it will be wonderful, inspiring and of great benefit to you and how you are seen and interact with others.

There will also be some potential pitfalls and challenges, many of which you will not see coming. That is OK. Our job is not to wrap in you cotton balls or bubble-wrap, protecting you from what are ultimately learning opportunities. Our role is and has always been to help you through these times, to support you (always!) and guide you where we can.

1) Keep talking to us. Even in those times when you are angry, frustrated or disappointed, we will always listen to you and provide help where we can. If you don’t want to share with your Mum or I, then seek help from others – whoever you feel comfortable with. Don’t dwell on issues or let them fester.

2) Choose your friends wisely. Who you spend your time with reflects on you and will certainly influence who you become, both good qualities and bad. You have some lovely friends now. Support them, be kind and know that with all relationships, just like ours, you will have ups and downs along the way. That is OK – in fact it is expected. It is during these times that you will learn who your good and true friends are and also how you are perceived by them, which will be revealed through your actions and theirs.

3) Keep a broad level of interests in many things as you already have shown and put into practice. The skills, passion, diversity of thought, leadership exposure and opportunities provide one of the great bases for much of how you will make choices in coming years.

4) Don’t worry about trying to be cool or liked. It is a bit clichéd in the adult world now, unfortunately, but it does not take away from the fact that ultimately being respected is harder to achieve but has greater meaning and purpose.

5) Know what you are passionate about. As an adult you will know that passion is critical, however many people of all ages struggle to define this. One of the first questions I ask my clients when coaching is: what are you passionate about? It is surprising how many people cannot answer this easily. Follow your passions; make sure they form part of what you do and who you are and if you can, build it into your work-life as you get older. This may not be clear for some years, which is OK, but keep it in mind.

6) Role model the best behaviours. We do not expect you to be perfect. Neither your Mum or I are, as you know. We all have strengths and faults, but none of them should stop you from trying to do the right thing because it is the right thing to do. I have found over the years that putting other’s needs ahead of your own is one of the most fulfilling aspects of life and most rewarding behaviours you can possess. Others will respect you for it.

7) As much as possible, remove assumption from situations and your thinking. Consider alternatives and think broadly – make this a habit. I see too many people place their own ideals and values on others and fail to see the bigger pictures and/or other people’s perspective. This relates to emotional intelligence and empathy – both things we will talk more about later.

8) Speaking of values and trust, earn the trust of others through what you say and most importantly back it up with what you do. If you commit to do something, do it. Meet your deadlines and continue to challenge yourself. Over time, learn what is most important to you (I will continue to help you with this) and maintain these values through how you portray yourself and decisions you make. Values are the absolute platform to work from as a person – know what yours are and develop a solid base to build upon as you reach adult-hood. Know who you are and stay true to your values!

9) Don’t be in a hurry to grow up. There are many benefits to the modern world, however one of the downsides in my opinion is the exposure to so much, so quickly. There is no doubt that 13 is the new 16 when I compare your life now to my childhood and teenage years. My big tip – not everything that is fun and worth doing has a screen attached or needs to be plugged in. Get outside often. Try new things.

10) Communication. It would be a surprise to some of your age that communication initially was through symbols and eventually the spoken word. Technology and newer methods of communication continue to challenge effective communication. As a result much of this is changing, however the written word remains a core component and has abundant power and authority. Also, continue to develop your speaking skills. They will hold you in good stead throughout your life. You have learned to spell and use grammar correctly. There is nothing more off-putting than seeing the poor English skills all too prominent online. Sadly, this is often reflected in important text such as resume’s and business documents. I thnk u no wat I meen!!!

11) Reading is the gift that keeps on giving. We love that you are a keen reader. Knowledge and understanding has always been and will be one of the great attributes. It enables you to form your own views and opinions based on various aspects from different perspectives. Just because it is written does not necessarily make it true. What it does do is provide depth of knowledge, varying perspectives and counter-arguments.  I love my Kindle as you do too…but keep on interspersing the traditional, physical book occasionally with the eBook, as you already do.

12) Finally, much of what I have mentioned in this list comes down to values and respect. Respect for your family and how we love one another because we are family but also because of how we treat each other. Continue to work on this – both how you respect yourself and others. Respect property – your own and that of others; respect the opportunities provided to you and those earned by you; do not take anything you have in this world for granted – there are no guarantees they will always be there and many people are not so fortunate.

We hope that this list, although not definitive, makes sense now and in the future. Life is wonderful. Life is challenging. These points may assist you and will probably become more relevant and meaningful over the next few years.

Do what you will with the words – words that have real meaning to us, more than just script on a page – and understand they will continue to form the themes for how we will support and help you, as we have in your first 13 years.

Love,

Mum and Dad xxx

**********

Never miss an issue of Linked 2 Leadership, subscribe today.
Learn, Grow & Develop Other Leaders

———————
Steve Riddle

Steve Riddle is the owner of CoachStation
He is making a difference by focusing on leadership & people development
Email | LinkedIn | Twitter | Facebook | Web | Skype: steve.riddle36

Image Sources: 1.bp.blogspot.com

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 41,967 other followers

%d bloggers like this: