Leadership Intuition: Learning To Listen To Your Gut

Intuition

Several years ago my strategic partner and good friend Hugh Massie, Founder and CEO of DNA Behavior International, mentioned that he was learning to trust his gut instincts more.

This caught my attention since he is a CPA by training and a very results-oriented, rational person.

Then as I read Malcolm Gladwell’s book, Blink, I learned about this idea of the “second mind,” as he called it. Gladwell raised the visibility of the power of intuition, but I suspect that it was only for a short time for most people.

Using Intuition

Last summer at the National Speakers Association Convention, I met a leadership consultant who was building her speaking platform around the idea that leaders (who have mostly been trained like engineers to trust rationality and disregard feelings) needed to learn to use their intuition more to make better decisions.

Just recently I read another impressive book, THE WAY OF THE SEAL: Think Like an Elite Warrior to Lead and Succeed and was interested to see that author Mark Divine, a former CPA and Navy SEAL, made instinct (awareness of gut feelings) a major theme of the book.

His proposition is that leaders should train like Navy SEALS to intentionally use both rational (conscious mind) and instinctive (drawing from the unconscious mind) inputs to make the best decisions.

Albert Einstein didn’t read Blink, and he certainly wasn’t a Navy SEAL, but evidently he discovered this related theory early on, saying this:

“The intuitive mind is a sacred gift and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift.”

I’m seeing a pattern from these different points on the topic of intuition, so let’s explore it a bit deeper.

Examining the Gift of Intuition

Intuition is about listening to your subconscious mind (gut instincts) to pull forward information and feelings that you’ve accumulated over a lifetime. Warriors have to rely on instinct, using every possible sense from outside and every stirring from inside to stay alive.

Having a good visual memory for shapes and landforms is crucial for a military pilot. Being able to store and recall patterns of logic and information is important for an entrepreneur or business person.

Emotional memory is probably the strongest memory that we have, and it’s also the one most quickly accessed. Emotional memory is the one we feel in our gut, and it helps us access the gigabytes of memory stored in our subconscious faster than any processor yet made.

“So, intuition is this stream of awareness that flows from our subconscious to our conscious, but it requires our tuning in to hear the signal.”

Can It Be Learned?

Can intuition be learned? The short answer is yes, but the issue is whether you will develop your awareness and then allow intuition to move from your gut to your mind. It’s not a problem when data is tagged with emotions; it’s ready for quick retrieval and usually easy to access. At other times, it’s as simple as stopping to ask yourself this:

“What is my gut telling me about this—what is my intuition?”

Sometimes data needed for intuition needs help in getting to our awareness, and this situation is where we have to be more intentional about accessing it. It usually means taking time to shut down our rational thinking and reflect usually in a quiet setting away from distractions. Sounds a lot like meditation and prayer, doesn’t it? I believe it’s very similar and can be the same.

Reflecting, waiting, and listening with our feelings for insight is a practice used by wise people throughout the history of civilization.

And it has become a lost art in our increasingly fast-paced society.

If we ignore or fail to cultivate the intuitive half of our decision-making abilities, we become less than our best as leaders and merely rely on the facts at hand.

My Experience With Intuition

I think that I’m a very logical and rational person, but I’ve also been blessed with a gift for patterns and a good memory. In recent years I’ve learned to value what these gifts reveal to me and trust my intuition more.

I do have to be careful about not jumping to conclusions with too little rational information, but overall I’m feeling more confident in my decision-making and greater commitment to execution.

What about you? What has been your experience? How often do you integrate your intuition in your decision-making? Why do you believe that some leaders ignore or don’t develop their intuitive abilities when it would produce better results and greater success? Please share your thoughts and comments.

**********

Never miss an issue of Linked 2 Leadership, subscribe today here!
Learn, Grow & Develop Other Leaders

——————–
Lee Ellis

Lee Ellis is Founder & President of Leadership Freedom LLC & FreedomStar Media.
He is a leadership consultant and expert in teambuilding, executive development & assessments
Email | LinkedIn | Web | Blog | Book | Facebook | Twitter

His latest book is called Leading with Honor: Leadership Lessons from the Hanoi Hilton.

Image Sources: katenasser.com

Leadership Freedom Checklist – Where Are You on the Journey?

**********

Never miss an issue of Linked 2 Leadership, subscribe today here!
Learn, Grow & Develop Other Leaders

——————–
Lee Ellis

Lee Ellis is Founder & President of Leadership Freedom LLC & FreedomStar Media.
He is a leadership consultant and expert in teambuilding, executive development & assessments
Email | LinkedIn | Web | Blog | Book | Facebook | Twitter

His latest book is called Leading with Honor: Leadership Lessons from the Hanoi Hilton.

Leadership Freedom Checklist [Infographic] by the team at FreedomStar Media

Leading with Honor: 4 Ways to Have What It Takes

Are you alarmed by the frequency of ethical scandals in recent years?  No doubt, you have seen the headlines about Wall Street greed, but ethical problems are just as prevalent on Main Street where bookkeepers, purchasing agents, and business owners violate the trust that others have placed in them.

Lackluster Leadership

Think of the headlines in recent months:

  • A highly respected coach resigned for covering up NCAA violations by his players
  • A Congressman is convicted of accepting bribes
  • A religious leader cheated on his wife, another is accused of using his authority to fleece the flock
  • Teachers changed students’ responses on standardized tests and administrators collaborated in cover-up
  • A college inflated the average SAT score of their students to improve its image.

What is happening to our society?  Does anyone care about honorable leadership?  What can you do about it?  What have others done that might guide those of us who seek to turn the tide in this onslaught against character-based leadership?

Our Best Leadership Examples

It seems ironic that some of the best examples of leading with honor come from the POW camps of North Vietnam, an environment so life-threatening that one might expect to see frequent examples of self-centered, self-serving leadership.

But when life and limb were on the line, these brave leaders chose honor over comfort, humiliation over cooperation with the enemy.

Their courageous service can inspire and show us what is required to lead with honor, and I’ve shared my Vietnam POW story and 14 leadership lessons learned in my latest book, Leading with Honor: Leadership Lesson from the Hanoi Hilton.

4 Lessons of Courageous Leadership

Let’s look at a few of the lessons that I learned from these courageous leaders.

1) Know Yourself

The POWs leaders were experienced and strong yet they had no choice but to be humble. The enemy used torture and isolation to try to break their will and force them to cooperate in making propaganda. They were vulnerable, stripped to their core; they could not pose or pretend they were something they were not.  Fortunately, they were solid—healthy people with a strong character that enabled them to lead with honor through the most unimaginable humiliation.

“If you don’t know yourself and have a peace about who you are, your fears and insecurities will take you out.”

Rather than pursuing your passion and purpose using your unique talents, style, and convictions, you will constantly be comparing yourself to others and trying to guide your life by someone else’s ways and standards. Alternatively, when you know and accept yourself, you can be authentic, leading from your own true north. Objectively knowing your strengths gives you confidence, while awareness of your weaknesses gives you humility.

Few will ever be POWs, but eventually we will all face situations that expose who we really are.  Spend time with yourself and go deep. Accept who you are, but realize there is always room for growth; work every day to build yourself strong so you can lead authentically, from the inside out.

2) Clarify Your Values and Standards and Commit to Them

The POWs had a uniform code of conduct that everyone knew and was charged with following. It acted like signs along the road giving direction and providing a framework for decisions, choices, and behaviors, helping them stay on the right path even in the most difficult situations.

Unfortunately, most people have only generic assumptions and a superficial understanding about their moral values and ethical commitments.

Jeb Magruder, White House advisor who went to jail, said that he had been taught right but somewhere along the way he “lost his ethical compass.”  We are all cut from the same cloth as Magruder and without regularly clarifying our commitments, we will drift off course as well.

3) Confront Your Doubts and Fears

Fears and insecurities take out more leaders than anything else and they generally can be traced back to the first point above—your identity—knowing who you are and being comfortable with yourself. Even the smartest, toughest, and best leaders face insecurities and fears.

The POW leaders were tough warriors but they all struggled with fear. Commander Jim Stockdale endured frequent physical abuse and more than four years in solitary confinement, so naturally, there were fears, but he did his duty and suffered the consequences. Great leaders know that fear is the norm, and they know they must lean into the pain of their fears to do what they know is right.

“Courage does not mean that you are not afraid, but that you do what is right when it feels scary or unnatural.”

4) Connect with Your Support Team

In your struggle to lead with honor, you are like any other warrior—it’s not good to fight alone. That’s why the enemy tried so hard to isolate the POWs in North Vietnam and why the POWs risked everything to keep the communication lines open. Even the toughest POWs relied on the counsel and encouragement of their teammates.

Authentic leaders realize they cannot see every situation objectively.

On the tough choices, you will usually need the perspective of someone who is outside the issue to help you evaluate the situation. Build a network of a few key advisors who can help you navigate the treacherous waters ahead.

Final Thoughts

Our culture desperately needs men and women who will lead with honor. Don’t take it for granted that you will lead honorably. Engage in the battle required to guard your character.

To be prepared, know yourself, clarify your values, standards, and commitments, confront your doubts and fears, and connect with your support team.  Then you are ready to face the giants and avoid the headlines of failure.

==============

Special note from Tom Schulte, Editor and Publish of L2L:

Leading with Honor book

How did American military leaders in the brutal POW camps of North Vietnam inspire their followers for six, seven, and even eight years to remain committed to the mission, resist a cruel enemy, and return home with honor? What leadership principles engendered such extreme devotion, perseverance, and teamwork?

In this powerful, practical, award-winning book, Lee Ellis, a former Air Force pilot, candidly talks about his five and a half years of captivity and the fourteen key leadership principles behind this amazing story. His story has been featured on networks such as C-SPAN, CNN, ABC World News, and Fox News Network as well as hundreds of speaking engagements throughout the world. Learn more about Leading with Honor.

**********

Never miss an issue of Linked 2 Leadership, subscribe today here!
Learn, Grow & Develop Other Leaders

——————–
Lee Ellis

Lee Ellis is Founder & President of Leadership Freedom LLC & FreedomStar Media.
He is a leadership consultant and expert in teambuilding, executive development & assessments
Email | LinkedIn | Web | Blog | Book | Facebook | Twitter

His latest book is called Leading with Honor: Leadership Lessons from the Hanoi Hilton.

The Epiphany to Growth and Prosperity: 3 Ways to Lead Higher

Growing People

Looking back after two month now, 2013 was a very busy year for many of us—what a blur of activity! Some of my closest friends were worried that I wouldn’t be able to sustain the pace of traveling, speaking, book signing, consulting, coaching and even working on a new book.

There were challenging moments, but amazingly my energy and spirits remained high. I attribute this not to a special energy drink but to the infusion of generous encouragement and affirmation that I received from so many people throughout the year.

Not only did I receive much more than I gave, but I have never felt so free to be myself. This giving from others brought me a new level of freedom and made the difference in my year. 

Understanding Freedom

As a former Vietnam POW, you can imagine how meaningful freedom is to me and how sensitive I am about the concept. As a leadership consultant and coach, I see that we all have mindsets from our past that are like shackles holding us  back from being our best self—hence the tagline for my consulting company that says “Freeing Leaders To Lead Higher.”

Not only did I receive much more than I gave, but I have never felt so free to be myself.

Now in reflection, I can see how others freed me to climb higher in 2013. With this fresh perspective, I am now paying it forward in 2014.

3 Ways to Lead Higher

To do this, I’ll need a spirit of giving every day of the year in three specific areas: personhood, performance, and potential.

1. Give Affirmation

This is about personhood. We all want to count, to be valued, to know that we are important in this life. In our daily interactions with others, we have a choice to be a giver or a taker; it’s much healthier to give than to be needy taker.

My goal is to authentically lift others up and not add to the burdens of self-doubt that we all carry. I’m going to be more intentional about affirming their uniqueness, recognizing their talents, and helping them see how special they are.

2. Give Encouragement

This is about performance. Positive feedback reinforces mental and muscle memory, and it also energizes the recipient. That’s the energy that was propelling this old fighter pilot to light the afterburners and soar rather than fizzle in 2013! I want to encourage others, but sometimes my old habits as an Air Force instructor pilot kick in.

Grading every maneuver against perfection was required in that job, but it’s not very helpful in leadership (and most relationships, for that matter). I need to raise my awareness and emotional intelligence to quickly and consistently recognize small successes and good execution.

3. Give Others a Vision for Their Future

This is about potential. From my early years, I had a few people who saw something in me that I didn’t see. In small and large ways, they communicated that vision to me—subtly calling me out to reach my potential.

During the difficult years in the POW cells, those messages echoed through my mind and inspired me onward toward the day when I would finally be free again.

For years I have made it part of my mission to pay back the bank for this great investment that was made in me by so many. This year, I want to take the risk and double down in expressing my faith in others because I personally know how valuable it can be.

We all have times when we fight the demons of discouragement and doubt, but focusing on ourselves usually makes us needy.  Instead of being takers, let’s commit to become better givers.  It’s a freeing behavior for the giver and the receiver, and it’s mutually beneficial for both parties.  Will you join me in my effort to free others to live and lead higher? 

**********

Never miss an issue of Linked 2 Leadership, subscribe today here!
Learn, Grow & Develop Other Leaders

——————–
Lee Ellis

Lee Ellis is Founder & President of Leadership Freedom LLC & FreedomStar Media.
He is a leadership consultant and expert in teambuilding, executive development & assessments
Email | LinkedIn | Web | Blog | Book | Facebook | Twitter

His latest book is called Leading with Honor: Leadership Lessons from the Hanoi Hilton.

Image Sources: ryanericsongcanlas.files.wordpress.com

Adams and Jefferson Leadership Traits: Which One Was the Better Leader?

Adams and Jefferson

American presidents come and go throughout history, but think about the presidents that you regard as great leaders. Regardless of their political persuasion, do historically successful presidential leaders have common natural talents and traits? 

Accomplishments Compared

More specifically, let’s compare presidents John Adams and Thomas Jefferson*. Both presidents were successful on many points. Here’s a brief look at their accomplishments :

John Adams

  • Massachusetts Delegate and Leading member of the Continental Congress
  • Leading advocate and signer of the Declaration of Independence
  • Author, Massachusetts Constitution
  • Diplomat to France
  • Negotiator and signor of the Paris Peace Accord ending the war with England
  • Minister to England
  • First U.S. Vice President
  • Second U.S. President
  • President of the Massachusetts Society of Arts and Sciences

Thomas Jefferson

  • Delegate to the Virginia House of Burgesses and the Continental Congress
  • Author of the Declaration of Independence
  • Governor of Virginia
  • Diplomat to France and delegate to the Paris Peace Talks with Adams
  • U.S. Secretary of State
  • U.S. Vice-President
  • U.S. President (2 Terms)
  • Founder of the University of Virginia
  • Godfather of John Quincy Adams

“Interesting Fact – Adams and Jefferson died on the same day, July 4th, 1826. Adams was 90 years old, and Jefferson was 83 years old.”

The Inevitable Comparison

For most of us in society, we tend to have a list of requirements in our minds about the traits of great leaders. Some of them would be –

  • Strong
  • Charismatic
  • Decisive
  • Bold
  • Fearless
  • Intelligent
  • Delegator
  • Great Communicator

Then, we translate those same traits into our everyday lives and assume that we must have those same traits to be an effective leader; and if you don’t have those traits, then being a leader isn’t your destiny.

Nothing could be further from the truth—we’re all leaders whether we realize it or not.

While Adams and Jefferson each had similar noted achievements, they had very different leadership styles. Through their own personality struggles and challenges, they still found a way to achieve greatness as leaders.

Significant Leadership Trait Differences

In David McCullough’s book, John Adams, he takes an interesting, deeper look at the natural and learned traits of these leaders. Take a look at these behavioral traits and note the remarkable difference between them** –

John Adams

  • Take-Charge Personality
    • Assertive, self-assured, got results
    • Intolerant of indifference
  • Outgoing
    • A talker and entertainer
    • Passionate and good sense of humor
  • Fast-Paced
    • Controlling, Never learned to flatter
    • Cranky, impulsive, tactless
  • Spontaneous
    • Struggled with bringing order to his life
    • Had difficulty staying  focused on one thing at a time

Thomas Jefferson

  • Cooperative
    • Subtle, soft-spoken
    • Moved slowly, cautious
  • Reserved
    • Remote, little sense of humor
    • Rarely revealed his inner feelings
  • Patient
    • Gracious, rarely disagreed with anyone publicly
    • Avoided dispute and confrontation
  • Planned
    • Always polite, diplomatic
    • Neat, kept letter perfect records, detailed

Obviously, both leaders had their own unique set of strengths and struggles, but they worked within their traits to emerge as accomplished individuals in their own regard.

So, What’s the Point?

Where your leadership is concerned, it’s important to remember this:

  • Know your strengths and struggles, and manage them well.
  • Lead from a place of humble yet confident authenticity.
  • Balance your leadership by bringing others around you with different talent and traits.

As we remember and honor our nation’s leaders on Presidents Day this month, think about the president that relates closely to your own leadership style and be encouraged to fulfill your own leadership role in society. Please share your comments in this forum. 

*More information about the Adams and Jefferson comparison is featured in the Leading with Honor Group Training program. To learn more, go to FreedomStarMedia.com/Training.

**Traits described in the book “John Adams” by David McCullough, © 2001 Simon & Schuster, New York

**********

Never miss an issue of Linked 2 Leadership, subscribe today here!
Learn, Grow & Develop Other Leaders

——————–
Lee Ellis

Lee Ellis is Founder & President of Leadership Freedom LLC & FreedomStar Media.
He is a leadership consultant and expert in teambuilding, executive development & assessments
Email | LinkedIn | Web | Blog | Book | Facebook | Twitter

His latest book is called Leading with Honor: Leadership Lessons from the Hanoi Hilton.

On Leadership, Soaring and Embracing the Power of Belief

Airshow

A while back I was in Oshkosh, WI attending the 2012 AirVenture event, a week-long airshow and exposition of experimental aircraft, homebuilts, and generally everything aviation for the civilian aviation enthusiast.  

It’s quite a show that attracts aviation enthusiasts from all over the world.  In my previous post, we explored beliefs and how they impact our perspective.  Today, let’s continue that thread by looking at the idea of strong beliefs and how important they are for success. 

The Early Belief in Aviation

Aviation as we know it began with the Wright brothers – bicycle shop mechanics and inventors who believed they could fly.  They kept at it until they proved they could.  Another name heard often here at AirVenture is Dick Rutan, the former Air Force fighter pilot who in 1986 along with his co-pilot, Jeana Yeager, made the first ever non-stop, unfueled flight around the word.

And yes, their “Voyager”, was a one of a kind experimental aircraft designed by Dick, his brother Burt, and Jeana.

If you think you can do a thing or think you can’t do a thing, you’re right

Here at Oshkosh, as I look at rows upon row of literally hundreds of beautiful flying machines constructed by the pilots who flew them to Oshkosh, I am impressed again with the power of belief and, of course, hard work.  They tend to be partners to success in life.

The saying, “If you think you can do a thing or think you can’t do a thing, you’re right” may have been first coined by Abraham Lincoln, but it’s most often attributed to Henry Ford.  Regardless, it seems to bear much truth.

Witnessing Belief and Confidence

As an instructor pilot, I trained many students right out of college to fly supersonic jet aircraft.  Most made it through the course and a few washed out. The one common characteristic was the degree to which they believed they could succeed.  It takes a great deal of confidence to fly at 500 miles an hour with three feet of wingtip spacing on your leader.

Not only does it take a great deal of skill, but without confidence you will never be able to perform consistently.

I often told my students, “I can see you have the talent to do this and I’m confident that I can teach you.  But for it to work, you must picture it in your mind and you must believe that you can do it.”

And predictably, most of those who didn’t make it were those who just couldn’t believe they could do it.

So what about you (and me)?  What is it that we’re struggling with right now that we have the capability to do, but just aren’t sure if we have what it takes?  Quite often when we lack confidence we also lack passion; they seem to go together.  What’s motivating you to want to achieve a goal or make a change in your life?  Can you picture yourself succeeding?   Do you really believe down deep it can happen?  If the answer is “yes I can”, then you probably can. 

These are my thoughts, but the Leading with Honor community would love to hear from you.  Many of you can speak to this issue of believing (confidence) and we’d all benefit from hearing your thoughts.

**********

Never miss an issue of Linked 2 Leadership, subscribe today here!
Learn, Grow & Develop Other Leaders

——————–
Lee Ellis

Lee Ellis is Founder & President of Leadership Freedom LLC & FreedomStar Media.
He is a leadership consultant and expert in teambuilding, executive development & assessments
Email | LinkedIn | Web | Blog | Book | Facebook | Twitter

His latest book is called Leading with Honor: Leadership Lessons from the Hanoi Hilton.

Image Sources: thedigitalaviator.com

Lead Like Santa: 6 Immutable Principles

Be Wise, Prioritize!

Santa’s mission is simple: Spread good cheer and make people happy.

Simple enough, right? Oh, if it were only so…

Upon reflection, the problem with this over-simplified mission statement is that Santa’s job is not simple at all! It is very complex and fraught with unimaginable difficulties.

Santa’s Mission

The mission that Santa is on is daunting:

  • Multiple time zones
  • A narrow window of execution
  • Extreme weather conditions
  • Dealing with Reindeer and Elves (little people)
  • Personalized merchandise
  • A most finicky clientele (ever-changing demographics of absolute believers, skeptics, form-believers and naysayers.)
  • Oh, and this: “Failure is not an option!

Only an adroit and seasoned leader of exceptional capacity can deliver the goods (goodies) year after year.

So what is Santa’s secret? Read on!

Lead Like Santa

While participating in a recent Air War College-sponsored Reindeer and Claus Studies (RCS) trip to the North Pole, students from the Air War College experienced a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to tour Santa’s World Headquarters.

Santa was busy–he is always busy–but he made time to sit down with our group. After sharing a generous offering of milk and cookies, he offered some insights into his success as a leader.

He did not look like any leader I know, but when he began to speak, I noticed a twinkle in his eye and redness in his cheeks.

He was authentic. He was in his element. His message, albeit simple, was direct and to the point.

I did my best to capture every word, but my hands were freezing. Sage advice straight from the big guy’s mouth:

Santa’s Six Immutable Principles of Leadership

1. Be Steady and Consistent

Santa cannot have a bad day. He maintains a “Ho-Ho-Ho” attitude in all he does. It is infectious. His steady demeanor underpins a healthy work environment for his Elves.

Santa uniquely balances the need to be jolly with a focused determination to get the job done.

He message is consistent: “the right toy, to the right child, in the nick of time, every time.” Everyone shares the vision, everyone is on the team.

2. Lead by Example

Santa is a mentor for want-to-be ‘helpers’ all over the world. He works hard to maintain his unfitness; no child wants to sit on a skinny Santa’s lap.

He never asks his Elves to do anything that he has not done himself a thousand times before.

Moreover, he walks the walk of a leader by assuming personal risk to deliver those presents to deserving boys and girls. He sets the pace, he sets the example, and he leads from the front.

3. Reward Good Performance

Santa knows his reindeer and he knows who is naughty and nice. He rewards good performance. Results matter, they matter a lot. At the North Pole good performance is rewarded, good performance is the standard.

4. Have a Personal Touch

Santa reads every letter written by every child. He chooses the right toy and delivers that toy personally. Santa might delegate authority to get things done, but the responsibility is his alone.

5. Never Quit

Santa never gives up. One year he had to think ‘out of the box’ when confronted with a thick fog that blinded his veteran reindeer team. Santa, in a moment of genius, put Rudolph, an upstart, at the front of his sleigh, making it possible to navigate from the iridescent glow radiating from the young reindeer’s nose.

Santa, in his typical manner, gave all the credit to Rudolph. Enough said.

6. Check everything twice

Not one to micromanage, yet nothing is left to chance. Imagine a good child being left off of Santa’s list, or worse yet, a bad child receiving an undeserved present.

Santa leads with a light touch, but he knows how to ask the right questions, and when to get involved.

Believe and Achieve

The long flight back to Maxwell Air Force Base allowed time to ruminate over Santa’s message. His leadership style is not flashy (except for his red clothes, red sleigh and reindeer team) but grounded in centuries of experience overcoming seemingly insurmountable obstacles. Santa is the leader we all strive to become.

His principles work; one must simply believe.

Merry Christmas!

**********

Never miss an issue of Linked 2 Leadership, subscribe today here!
Learn, Grow & Develop Other Leaders

———————–

Professor Gene C. Kamena is brought to you through his friend and L2L Contributing Author Lee Ellis

Gene C. Kamena is Professor of Leadership and Ethics at the Air War College
He is retired from the Army as a Colonel of Infantry
LinkedIn | Blog

Image Source: Linked2Leadership.com

Related Post: 

On Leadership and Santa Claus, CEO via Linked2Leadership

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 41,975 other followers

%d bloggers like this: