Leadership Joe

Mounter Climbers

Who needs you most today? Ask yourself this question.

I write this sitting in the emergency room as the sun rises and as my wife is passing a kidney stone…

Back (Pack) Story

A few years back, I strapped on my backpack and joined a group of mountain climbers heading for the summit of a 14,005′ mountain in Colorado.

The energy level at the trailhead was incredible. It was also incredibly dark and I hadn’t brought a headlamp or flashlight.

“I will just have to stick close to my partner,” I thought to myself.

Since my partner was the climb team leader and was packing a GPS I felt at ease. Of course, that was before his 6′ 5″ frame began taking enormous strides into the darkness.

Long-story short, after months of rigorous training — climbing steps in the football stadium with a 40-pound pack, riding my bike and breaking in my boots on sidehill treks — I was forced to step off the trail within the first five minutes of our climb. I was unable to take another step, and I couldn’t speak out to let my leader know I was falling behind.

Falling and Failing

As I stood along the side of the trail gasping for air, listening to my heart pound in my head, the rest of the climb team walked passed me. I had never felt so alone or abandoned in my life.

I thought, “In a minute I will be severed from the team.”

Before I could complete my thought two other climb team members stepped off the trail, not to rescue me, but because they couldn’t breath either. When we finally were able to speak we agreed that the summit was most likely not attainable for us, but that we’d stick together and go as far as we could.

A little further up the path our leader circled back to check on us. He reminded us “not to climb alone” to “keep monitoring each other,” to “remember that reaching the summit is not the goal,” and that “I will be back to check on you.”

Elevated Introspection

Over the next 13+ hours I learned a lot about myself, real leadership and the value of teamwork. Whenever I focused on my pain and my needs I found that my feet got heavier and the summit seemed farther away. Whenever my leader circled back and encouraged us to keep going, my backpack felt lighter and the prospect of reaching the summit reappeared.

We eventually stood on the summit that day, but to my amazement the summit experience paled in comparison to the rest of our journey. I guess that shouldn’t surprise me given all the relationship capital we developed and life lessons we learned during the 13 hour trek to and from the summit.

Too often I think we overemphasize the summit experience and forget that real leadership is needed every step of the way.

What leaders do on the ordinary days matters as much if not more than how they lead on the mission critical days.

Leadership in Cubicle-Land

Right now within your sphere of influence, under your leadership, there are at least three co-workers who feel they’ve been forced to step off the path.

They are gasping for air — struggling to take the next step from their office to the printer — feeling alone in their career journey.

I encourage you to walk around your office or building today. Ask your co-workers, “How are you doing?” Then look into their eyes as they answer. Are their words congruent with their expression?

If not, ask them “What do you need most right now from me?” or “How can I help you get from where you are to where you want to be?”

Maybe they need you to carry their backpack (burdens or stress) for a few days. Maybe they just need to know they are not alone on this journey. Maybe they will find their strength again if they feel needed by you. Maybe they don’t believe the summit can be reached.

Whatever the case may be, as their leader you need to reach out and encourage them to keep going otherwise you may turn around one day and realize you are standing alone on the summit.

So, who needs you most today? What are you going to do about it? Are you going to keep heading to the summit and leave them gasping along the side of the trail? What might they need anyway? I would love to hear you story!

——————–
Joe Colavito is Vice President, Development and Delivery at Wells Real Estate Funds
He is an Inspirational Speaker, Storyteller, Author, and Coach
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Image Sources: crucialsurvival.com

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Future Leaders: Leading Our Most Precious

Our Most Precious

THREE STORIES, ONE POINT.

If we want our students to be equipped to lead in the future, we need to provide them with teachers and counselors who are equipped to lead them today.

Story #1 :: A Bad Apple

Bad Apple“Sit down! Pay attention!” commanded one of my 8th-grade daughter Courtney’s teachers on the first day of the new school year. The entire class went silent. “I didn’t want to be a teacher. I don’t like my job…”

Apparently she went on to set up the rules for her class, but my daughter and her classmates had already tuned her out. She’d been inspired enough for one day.

When Courtney got home and shared this story with me, something inside of me snapped. I didn’t rush off to the school to confront the teacher. I didn’t email the principal. Instead of wasting energy on a lost cause, I vowed to find a way to inspire and equip teachers, coaches, counselors and parents to take better care of our most valuable assets — our children.

I guess even a bad apple can plant a good seed. Thanks, teach!

You may not have wanted to be a teacher, and you may hate your job, but you’ve taught all of us a valuable life lesson: Who we entrust our children to matters.

Story #2 :: The Wet Blanket

Put it into your own words. My nephew Anthony stared at his Spanish project and re-read the red ink. Put it into your own words.

Unable to decipher the teacher’s code, he took a deep breath, got up and approached her desk. “I don’t understand why I got an 80.”

“You copied your paper from the Internet. You need to put it into your own words and I will raise it to a 90.”

Anthony’s spirit was crushed; for good reason. He’s a straight “A” student with a heart of gold. He’s one of those rare young men who wouldn’t even consider cheating.

“But these are my words,” he replied.

Wet Blanket AwardThe teacher simply shook her head, signaling that she wasn’t buying it. His knees went weak as he made his way back to his seat. These are my own words, he repeated to himself.

Whereas I was unwilling to confront my daughter’s teacher, my sister who is gentle and sweet 99% of the time, lost her temper. Her maternal instincts kicked in and her little fingers went to pounding out an email.

She knew the truth. Anthony just happens to have sparks of genius in writing, math and music. A few weeks earlier he’d aced the NY State Regents test in Math.

Now, after following the teachers instructions, gathering a handful of facts from the Internet and writing an original paper in Spanish his integrity was being questioned. Actually, it was never questioned, nor was he. It was unilaterally judged; incorrectly.

“Mom, these are my words. If she doesn’t believe me I could read it to her translating it back into English.”

When I heard this story I thought, What would cause a teacher to treat a gifted student this way? Why would a teacher toss a wet blanket on a spark of genius?

In search of an answer, I brought these questions to an expert panel, my parents. My dad, a retired elementary school principal, and my mother who loved teaching 5th-graders for over 25 years. I couldn’t imagine either of them treating a student that way. As we discussed this disheartening incident my dad offered this insight.

“Unfortunately a kid with that much talent causes extra work for the teacher. They can’t treat them the same way.”

Wow! Really? Our brightest students are seen as a burden? Yo, teacher, please tell me, in your own words of course, that this isn’t the truth. And if it is the case, do your students a favor, take your wet blanket to a job where it could do some good. I hear the Forest Service is looking for some fire fighters.

Story #3 :: Role Identity Crisis

“You need to think about the environment that best suits you. Would you rather be at the beach, the mountains, or the inner city?” asked the man as he checked his watch for the third time since they’d entered the room.

“That’s a good question,” thought my friend. “…If we were looking to buy a condo instead of trying to figure out the best choice of major and ideal career path for my daughter.”

When Tony shared what he and his daughter, a junior at our local public high school, had experienced in their recent meeting with her guidance counselor, I cringed.

Although I understand the need to check the “fit” between a student’s interests and the geographic location of their college choices, it seemed like this process needed a little reverse-engineering.

I asked my friend what profiles or testing the counselor had done to help Lauren understand her unique abilities, interests, learning styles, etc.

“None.” He shook his head. “I guess he expects her to know.”

What! No wonder the guidance counselor was acting like a real estate agent or travel advisor. He doesn’t have anything concrete to work with.

Equipping Our Future Leaders

If we expect our guidance counselors to guide our future leaders into the right major, college and eventually their ideal job wouldn’t it make sense that we equip them with the best tools to play their role?

My heart breaks when I hear stories like this one. If Lauren and others aren’t exposed to testing, experiences and meaningful conversations with mentors that help them discover who they are, how can we expect them to know what to do? We can’t.

Despite having parents who were educators, loved me dearly, and poured their lives into mine, I had no clue what I was made (created) to do after high school; or college for that matter.

I followed some misguided guidance from a professor and became an accounting major.

I hopped from one job to the next after college, 10 in 16 years, before I finally discovered my unique ability and passion. Only then did I feel like I finally stopped going through the motions and found my life mission.

Save our Children

Today, I find myself compelled to save my children and yours from becoming restless wanderers in the marketplace. Recent studies indicate that over 70% of American workers are disengaged — going through the motions at work. But it doesn’t have to be this way if we change the way we educate, equip and encourage our children.

As parents, we pray for and dream about our children finding a loving spouse, a job they love, and a passion that makes them come alive each day. That’s why: Who we entrust our children to matters.

I hope these three stories have helped you understand one point:

If we want our students to be equipped to lead in the future, we need to provide them with teachers and counselors who are equipped to lead them today.

——————–
Joe Colavito is Vice President, Development and Delivery at Wells Real Estate Funds
He is an Inspirational Speaker, Storyteller, Author, and Coach
EmailLinkedInWebWebBlog

Image Sources: cchs.org

Leading In The No Wake Zone

CINAP  T’NOD

I took a deep breath and tried to process the name on the back of the boat in front of me. The letters were printed backward making them difficult to read.

Just seconds earlier, the truck towing this large boat had pulled out of the driveway onto Suwannee Dam Road, forcing me to slam on my breaks. We slowed from 40 miles an hour to zero in a matter of seconds, our seat belts keeping us glued to our seats.

DON’T PANIC … I suddenly realized what I had been reading. Quite an ironic name for that particular boat.

“Easy for him to say!” I blurted out. A quick glance in my rear view mirror confirmed that we narrowly missed getting rear-ended by the vehicle behind us.

The pick-up truck and the boat continued toward the intersection as I caught my breath. “That was the most dangerous, reckless, selfish driving maneuver I’ve ever seen!” I exclaimed to my wife Debbie.

Absolutely clueless!” she replied.

Following this frightful episode, our reckless driver pulled another dangerous stunt. Without warning the truck swerved into the turning lane. The light was red and we had a few cars in front of us.  We had barely pulled up next to the truck when the driver suddenly cut across the intersection.

Left In The Wake

Unfortunately, his second reckless decision in less than a quarter-mile left a wake of destruction behind him. In order to avoid crashing into the side of the boat, the driver of the mini-van was forced to slam on his brakes.

No!” shouted my wife. We watched in horror as the woman driving the SUV smashed into the mini-van crushing both vehicles.

True to the name on his boat, the driver of the pick up truck did not panic; nor did he stop. He just drove off to the lake, leaving the rest of us to sort out the details he left in his wake.

My wife and I could barely process what we had just seen, but the sequence of events was indelibly burned into our minds. I could see the two innocent victims introducing themselves in the center of the road in my rear view mirror.

We have to go back and be a witness, I said.  “Otherwise, the police will blame that poor woman,” Debbie added.

By the time we turned around, got back to the scene of the accident twenty-five other cars were being directly impacted by the careless driver’s actions. The SUV was leaking fluid all over the road and the woman was in shock. “I’ve never been in an accident,” were her first words. “Please stay with me.”

Fortunately, neither the drivers nor the woman’s two young daughters who were sitting in the back seat were injured. The man looked at the fluid and said, “Internal damages. Looks like she blew a gasket.”

A Wave of Destruction

After the police took our statements, and informed us that “the owner of the boat would not be charged because he was not directly involved,” I nearly blew a gasket or two of my own. I was steaming!

Not directly involved. Are you kidding me? None of this would have happened if he hadn’t been involved.

On the way home, we couldn’t stop thinking about the owner of that boat and the injustice related to the entire scene. “Those poor people will now spend money and lose time fixing the damage he caused,” I said. “And the driver of the pick up truck will go on about his business, spending the day on the lake as if nothing had happened,” replied Debbie. “That’s just not right!” we agreed.

“I wonder if the captain of DON’T PANIC observes the rules in the NO WAKE ZONE on the lake,” I mumbled. Based upon the way he endangered the rest of us on Suwanee Dam Road I doubt it, I thought to myself.

Leading In the Zone

As leaders in our homes, communities, and businesses, what can we learn from this accident scene? How might the driver of the pick-up truck’s irresponsible actions influence us to act more responsibly?

At a minimum, this situation has caused me to think about the people I leave in my WAKE ZONE each day. When I drive by others on the road, are others positively or negatively impacted by my actions? Are they better or worse off than before I crossed their path?

While it occurred to me that others may admire an assertive leader with a DON’T PANIC mantra, what if the reason for that leader’s demeanor is based upon a reckless, clueless, and selfish approach to business and life?

Imagine how dangerous our daily commute and our daily interactions in the business world would be if every leader adopted a DON’T PANIC, JUST CALL A MECHANIC approach to achieving their own goals.

If left unchecked, what impact would this type of leader have in the workplace?

What if, instead of protecting his or her followers’ best interests, the leader only protected his or her best interest?

As my wife and I learned on Suwanee Dam Road, we can’t always rely upon laws or corporate policies to hold our leaders, ourselves, or our neighbors accountable. That’s why, as leaders, we must establish our own NO WAKE ZONE policies based upon our core values.

Bringing It Back Home

We must value others more than ourselves if we expect our teams to follow us safely down the road we’ve established for achieving the goals of the organization.

One final thought: If you happen to know the owner of DON’T PANIC please pass along this message: on behalf of those he left in his wake: DON’T PANIC, BUT WAKE UP AND CONSIDER OTHERS WITHIN YOUR WAKE ZONE, before your actions lead to more serious damage!

Do you know of a leader who doesn’t appear to care about the impact he or she is having on others? What if the “employees” who assume they are operating in a NO WAKE ZONE are actually in a high risk zone? What if their leader wouldn’t think twice about pulling out in front of them to take full credit for their work or cutting corners to achieve his or her own goals? What actions can you take at work to create a NO WAKE ZONE?

Bookmark Leading In The No Wake Zone

——————–
Joe Colavito is Vice President, Development and Delivery at Wells Real Estate Funds
He is an Inspirational Speaker, Storyteller, Author, and Coach
Email | LinkedIn | Web | Web | Blog

Edited by Ken Jones

Image Sources:  flickr.com, fotosearch.com, calininjury.com, photobucket.com,mizzenmast.com

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Articles of Faith: Are You a Faithful Friend?

—————————————————————————–
This post is part of our Sunday Series titled “Articles of Faith.”
We investigate leadership lessons from the Bible.
See the whole series here. Published only on Sundays.
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What do you need most right now?

I recently asked this question to a successful leader who I met during a networking event last year. After an awkward silence he responded, “A friend“.

This leader’s response triggered a deep emotional response within me. It broke my heart, and called to mind these words of wisdom …

A faithful friend is a sturdy shelter; he who finds one finds a treasure.
A faithful friend is beyond price, no sum can balance his worth.
A faithful friend is a life-saving remedy, such as he who fears God finds;
For he who fears God behaves accordingly, and his friend will be like himself.
-Book of Sirach 6:14-17

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

Be a Friend Like Arnold…

Some men walk the course in a manner that inspires the rest of us to “raise our game”.

My friend Arnold Gardner walked this way. I will never forget walking the golf course with Arnold during the final round of the club championship in 2001. As we walked off the 7th tee, after Arnold’s chances of taking the trophy home sunk to the bottom of the lake, his next move seemed out of character. Instead of cussing, tossing a club, or storming off, Arnold smiled and shifted his attention to me. “You can still win this, Joe. You are playing great.”

Over the next few years, I came to learn Arnold’s response that day may have been out of character for me, but it suited him perfectly. Needless to say, from that day forward I became a raving fan and faithful follower of my new friend. That’s what made the news of his terminal liver cancer so hard to bear. I count myself amongst the blessed to have been close enough to Arnold to watch the way he continued to walk the course of life with grace, humility, and as a faithful friend to all who crossed his path until he passed away on April 25, 2007.

During the celebration of Arnold’s life, I learned that Arnold was the Pastor’s best friend. Apparently, Arnold approached him and became his encourager when he first moved to Atlanta to assume leadership of the church. They met weekly and often.

Arnold would call and ask,

“Have you seen the sky today? Take a moment and look up and see how beautiful it is.”

After Arnold learned that his condition was terminal he went to visit his friend. He sat him down and said, “I don’t want what I’m about to share with you to be a burden on you.” That was the way Arnold walked. His focus was always on other people. Two months before he passed away I ran into him at Bingo night at the school. He hugged me, allowed me to ask, “How ya doing?” and then shifted the entire conversation to me and my family.

Whenever I was with Arnold I felt like his best friend.

Come to find out, so did everybody else.

His longtime best friend and former golf teammate at Vanderbilt closed the celebration humbly and memorably. After beginning his final sentence, “So go out their and find a friend…” he stopped, teared up, looked up to heaven and said, “I’m even screwing this one up without you Arnold.” He took a moment to regain his composure and said,

Go out there and be a friend like Arnold.

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

A Legacy of Friendship

On the first anniversary of Arnold’s passing I hosted an event at our club. Arnold’s “best friends” came out of the woodwork, as did the stories of him walking alongside, encouraging, and befriending countless others. Arnold was a successful attorney, but I learned that 50% of his time was invested pro-bono in his later years. After that event I committed to becoming a friend like Arnold Gardner for others.

Last week I came across a verse in scripture that reminded me of the lessons I learned from Arnold. I’d like to share it now as a reminder to all of us that we are called to be a faithful friend to all those who cross our path.

Greater love has no man than this, that he lay down his life for his friends. -John 15:13

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

An Impact of Being A Friend

Can being a faithful friend really position us to be a “life-saving remedy”?

Recall my conversation with the successful leader whom I asked, “What do you need most right now?” At the time I asked that question, we had been talking for over an hour about his plan to commit suicide. I was not ready to have that conversation that day, nor was I equipped to help him. I was completely out of my comfort zone and area of expertise, or so I thought. As I scrambled to find the words to speak, to infuse him with hope, his answer to my question gave did it for me. When he disclosed that what he needed most was “A friend,” immediately I felt a sense of relief.

I can do that, I thought to myself. If all he needs is a friend to come alongside him, someone to talk to, someone to be there when he’s feeling down … I can do that!

What made me so sure I could be his friend? Or that being his friend would make a difference? Good questions. My confidence was based in the truth shared by Sirach over 2000 years ago: For he who fears God behaves accordingly, and his friend will be like himself. All I had to do was reflect upon the way Jesus laid down his life for all of us, and the way Arnold followed his lead. I left the rest up to the Holy Spirit as I set out to be a faithful friend to my newest friend.

Who needs your friendship most today? Who are you willing to lay your life down for? Who has been a faithful friend to you? After you ponder these questions I encourage you to do two things: First, call your faithful friends and thank them for their friendship. Second, go be a friend like Arnold.

——————–
Joe Colavito is Vice President, Development and Delivery at Wells Real Estate Funds
He is an Inspirational Speaker, Storyteller, Author, and Coach

Email | LinkedIn | Web | Web | Blog

Edited by Mike Weppler

Image Sources: ourfunnyplanet.com/tag/friendship, gallery.photo.net/photo

How Do You Handle Change?

Last night my friend’s wife and kids attended a play at the Fox Theatre, an Atlanta landmark.

They followed their cultural experience with a stop at another well-known landmark called The Varsity. They placed their order at the drive through window, paid in cash, received their change and hit the highway.  They arrived home around 11:20 p.m. My friend met the mini-van in the driveway expecting to see two sleeping angels in the back.

Much to his surprise they were still awake and shouting, “We got one-hundred change!”

Apparently the cashier at The Varsity overlooked two zeros on one of the dollar bills he gave to my friend’s wife. Instead of giving her seven $1 bills, she received six one-dollar bills plus a $100 bill. The kids were more than excited.

Time for Change

Before I share the rest of this story, allow me to ask you a couple of questions:

  • Do others consider you a change leader? If so, what’s your secret?
  • In other words, what does it take to become an effective ambassador of change?
  • How do real leaders handle change?
  • More specifically, how would you handle this “extra” change if it were placed in your hands?

Every day our circumstances, competition, and business conditions change. Whether you are a parent or a business leader, you are responsible for showing your “followers” how to handle change. Some change we see coming down the pike, thereby giving us time to prepare. Other change comes unexpectedly, without warning, catching us off guard.

Regardless of when and how change avails itself, how we handle change matters.

Managing Change

Volumes have been written on the topic of change management — ways to lead organizational, strategic and technological changes to improve a company’s bottom-line. Change management experts stress the need to be proactive verses reactive. They show how to leverage the lessons from the past and use the data available in the present to chart a better course for the future.

This may sound crazy or even naive to some of you, but I’ve never been a big proponent of change management. The entire process and philosophy seems like too much work for me.

The truth be told, I think there is an easier and better way to handle “external” change. It is to remain “internally unchanged.”

Imagine if every corporate and political leader in the world defined their core values, committed to remaining “unchanged” by circumstances and outcomes, and vowed to do what’s right for everyone involved every time external change occurred. Hard to imagine I know, but try. Call me simple, but I find it much easier to remain “internally unchanged” when it comes to making important decisions in business and life. Knowing in advance, making a pre-decision, that I will only do what’s right when I’m faced with handling change reduces my stress and increases the efficiency of my decision-making dramatically.

Said, differently, I believe that choosing to act with integrity up front limits the need to deploy elaborate change management strategies later on.

A Varsity Player

My friend asked his seven-year old son, “What do you think we should do? How should we handle this extra change?” My friend shared how an employee might get blamed for the mistake; maybe even lose his or her job at the Varsity.

Without hesitation his son responded with integrity. “We need to take it back?”

My friend continued his change management leadership lesson by asking, “What if they don’t know who it belongs to, then what should we do?”

Again, not missing a beat his son said, “We could give it to the people in Haiti.”

At this point I’m thinking, Hmm, if a seven-year old can handle change so easily, why are us adults having such a hard time with it every day? Perhaps it’s because as leaders we’ve been over thinking change.

Maybe we’ve gotten too focused on feeding the bottom line, and overlooked our need protect our employees or feed the poor in Haiti. Or just maybe we’ve subconsciously fallen victim to all the hype surrounding change management and forgot the truth: as leaders we must lead change from the inside out, not allowing external change to influence our decision-making.

The next time you find yourself faced with extra change I encourage you to ask yourself these three questions:

1). What’s the right thing to do?

2). Who else will be effective by the way I handle this change?

3). Will my core values remain unchanged if I proceed in this manner?

——————–
Joe Colavito is Vice President, Development and Delivery at Wells Real Estate Funds
He is an Inspirational Speaker, Storyteller, Author, and Coach
Email | LinkedIn | Web | Web | Blog

Image Sources: televisionbroadcast.com, 1.bp.blogspot.com

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Hey Leader, Who Needs You Most Today?

So, who needs you most today?

A few years back I strapped on my backpack and joined a group of climbers heading for the summit of a 14,005′ mountain in Colorado. The energy level at the trailhead was incredible. It was also very dark and I hadn’t brought a headlamp or flashlight. “I will just have to stick close to my partner,” I thought to myself. Since my partner was the climb team leader and was packing a GPS, I felt at ease.

Of course, that was before his 6′ 5″ frame began taking enormous strides into the darkness.

Unhappy Trails

Long story short, after months of rigorous training — climbing steps in the football stadium with a 40-pound pack, riding my bike and breaking in my boots on sidehill treks — I was forced to step off the trail within the first five minutes of our climb. I was unable to take another step, and I couldn’t speak out to let my leader know I was falling behind.

As I stood along the side of the trail gasping for air, listening to my heart pound in my head, the rest of the climb team walked passed me. I had never felt so alone or abandoned in my life. I thought, “In a minute I will be severed from the team.” Before I could complete my thought, two other climb team members stepped off the trail, not to rescue me, but because they couldn’t breath either. When we finally were able to speak ,we agreed that the summit was most likely not attainable for us.

But we also resolved that we’d stick together and go as far as we could.

A little further up the path our leader circled back to check on us. He reminded us “not to climb alone” to “keep monitoring each other,” to “remember that reaching the summit is not the goal,” and that “I will be back to check on you.”

Over the next 13+ hours I learned a lot about myself, real leadership and the value of teamwork. Whenever I focused on my pain and my needs I found that my feet got heavier and the summit seemed farther away. Whenever my leader circled back and encouraged us to keep going, my backpack felt lighter and the prospect of reaching the summit reappeared.

We eventually stood on the summit that day, but to my amazement the summit experience paled in comparison to the rest of our journey. I guess that shouldn’t surprise me given all the relationship capital we developed and life lessons we learned during the 13-hour trek to and from the summit. Too often I think we overemphasize the summit experience and forget that real leadership is needed every step of the way.

What leaders do on the ordinary days matters as much if not more than how they lead on the mission-critical days.

Keeping Things On Track

Right now within your sphere of influence, under your leadership, there are at least three co-workers who feel they’ve been forced to step off the path. They are gasping for air — struggling to take the next step from their office to the printer — feeling alone in their career journey.

I encourage you to walk around your office or building today. Ask your co-workers, “How are you doing?” Then look into their eyes as they answer. Are their words congruent with their expression? If not, ask them “What do you need most right now from me?” or “How can I help you get from where you are to where you want to be?”

So, who needs you most today?

What are you going to do about it? Are you going to keep heading to the summit and leave them gasping along the side of the trail? What might they need anyway?

Maybe they need you to carry their backpack (burdens or stress) for a few days. Maybe they just need to know they are not alone on this journey. Maybe they will find their strength again if they feel needed by you. Maybe they don’t believe the summit can be reached.

Whatever the case may be, as their leader you need to reach out and encourage them to keep going otherwise you may turn around one day and realize you are standing alone on the summit.

Bookmark Hey Leader, Who Needs You Most Today?

——————–
Joe Colavito is Vice President, Development and Delivery at Wells Real Estate Funds
He is an Inspirational Speaker, Storyteller, Author, and Coach
Email | LinkedIn | Web | Web | Blog

Image Sources: jeffszuc.com

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